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NEMA Plug and Outlet chart

Need some help identifying your wall outlet? We can help! Below is a description of the more common NEMA outlets and their numbers as well as some handy NEMA plug charts. You can also email us a pic of your plugs and outlets you need help identifying and we would be happy to help.

Here are the more common NEMA outlets:

  • 5-15 standard 15A 120 volt household outlet, the most common you see everywhere.
  • 5-20 standard 20A 120 volt household outlet, required by code in bathroom and behind your refrigerator.
  • 6-15 standard 15A 240 volt household outlet, found in homes and motels for running in-wall Air Conditioners, it’s the smaller brother to the NEMA 6-20 outlet. The 5-20 is not as common as a 6-20 outlet with it’s “T” shaped slot as it will accept both 6-20 and 6-15 plugs.
  • 6-20 standard 20A 240 volt household outlet, found in homes and motels for running in-wall Air Conditioners, also found occasionally in residential garages.
  • 6-50 standard 50A 240 volt 3-prong outlet, found in shops and garages used for large welders.
  • 10-30 standard 30A 240 volt 3-prong Dryer outlet found in homes build before 1996
  • 14-30 standard 30A 240 volt 4-prong Dryer outlet found in homes build in 1996 and newer
  • 14-50 standard 50A 240 volt 4-prong Range (electric stove top) outlet, also called RV-50 at the RV parks. By far the best universal connector to have for an EVSE. This is the one the Tesla guys install in their garages.
  • TT-30 (Travel Trailer 30amp) 30A 240 volt 3-prong outlet, the older style found in RV parks, not used in residential homes.
  • L6-30 (locking 240 volt 30amp) Twist-Lock 30A 240 volt outlet, my personal favorite locking connector, easy to find in stores, works great for adding adapters to portables EVSE’s equipped with a L6-30 plug.

220/240 volt outlets are commonly install with the ground pin towards the ceiling for safety. 110/120 volt outlets can be found mounted in all directions. Be sure to carefully look at your outlet and the chart, it's easy to mistake one outlet for another if your outlet has it's ground pin facing the floor instead of the ceiling or Vice Versa compared to the chart.

In the full NEMA number you will see a capital R or P. The R stands for Receptacle (outlet) and the P stands for Plug, we commonly truncate this to just the numbers and add the word receptacle (or outlet) at the end. For example 14-50R becomes 14-50 receptacle or 14-50 outlet.